Open-Source Tools (rsync, cURL, Git and more) on IBM i

Open Source IBMiOpen-source tools aren’t just for Linux anymore. Popular tools such as rsync, cURL, Git, and Wget have come to IBM i.

Although such open-source tools have been available for years in AIX distributions by Michael Perzl, those RPM packages required extra know-how, and weren’t officially supported by IBM.

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WMCPA 2017: A Glimpse into the Future of IBM i

Every year I look forward to WMPCA’s Spring Technical Conference. And it’s not just because this active IBM i user group does a great job of bringing experts to beautiful Wisconsin (in March!) to teach a broad range of IBM i topics.

I also love meeting the next generation of IBM i talent, always represented by Jim Buck’s RPG students at Gateway Technical College.

And, of course, there are many PHP and open source sessions to choose from, including these from me:

  • Make Your IBM i Sizzle with WordPress
  • Apache Web Server Magic on IBM i
  • Using DB2 and SQL with Open Source Languages on IBM i
  • PHP Tricks for the RPG Programmer: Graphics, Excel, PDFs, E-Mail and More

Also check out these sessions from our good friend Mike Pavlak:

  • PHP Web Security in an Insecure World
  • Web Services with PHP on IBM i

I could go on and on with recommendations, but I’m sure you’ll find plenty to love on your own.

Join us at the WMCPA Spring Technical Conference on March 14-16, 2017, at the Lake Lawn Resort on the shores of Delavan Lake!

 

PHP Performance on IBM i: Tuesday, Dec. 10 (limited-time discount)

Update: a recording of this class is available at http://iprodeveloper.com/let-your-php-apps-fly-ibm-i-high-performance-php-demand

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This Tuesday, learn how to Let Your PHP applications fly on IBM i. Busy? You can attend while getting your work done, with three one-hour class segments separated by breaks.

“Our process now runs 30-50% faster, thanks to one tip from Alan’s presentation.”
—Mike Meszaros, Software Developer, Specialty Pipe & Tube

You’ll learn to quickly improve your application’s performance, including:

  • Give your app that “snap” by optimizing its front end as well as PHP
  • Configure Zend Server for performance
  • Diagnose bottlenecks
  • Leverage unique IBM i performance tools
  • Optimize DB2 and the IBM i toolkit

I’ll be there to answer your questions. What’s more, the presentation will be archived for 60 days so you can review the material afterward.

“Alan is the performance guru of PHP on IBM i. When we encountered unexpectedly slow queries and program calls, Alan showed us a configuration change that helped our application run 3x faster, creating happy users. Thanks, Alan!”
—Adam Chuk Shirley, PHP Developer, Sabel Steel Service

What: PHP on IBM i performance eLearning event
When: Tuesday, December 10, 2013: three one-hour segments with two one-hour breaks, starting 11AM and ending 4PM (ET).
Where: Online
Cost: $150 (but discounted to $99 through Friday, Dec. 6)

Details and registration: http://iprodeveloper.com/let-your-php-apps-fly-ibm-i-high-performance-php

March updates to PHP Toolkit for IBM i

All are invited to try and enjoy this update before it’s officially packaged:
XMLSERVICE 1.7.8 and PHP Toolkit 1.5.0

My favorite part is in the performance improvements. There are also bug fixes to data areas and data queues, configurable PASE CCSID, an HTTP-based driverless transport, and more.

Change log for PHP Toolkit (front end)

Change log for XMLSERVICE (back end)

Try these and let me know how it goes (especially if you encounter any issues).

Why PHP on IBM i

A colleague asked me for a catchy quote about why IBM i aficionados should choose PHP. Some thoughts to start with:

1. With PHP you can build your dreams.

2. PHP lets you start simply and grow.

3. PHP combines open source with the stability and support of IBM i.

4. Learn PHP and you’ll gain a skill you can use everywhere, but that you’ll WANT to use on IBM i.

ZF2 and DB2 for IBM i

I’d like to address questions about DB2 support in Zend Framework 2.x. Because I helped create the IBM i-friendly DB2 adapter for Zend Framework 1.x, I’ve followed the development of a similar adapter for ZF2.

(updated January 30, 2013, upon the release of ZF 2.1)

Q. Does ZF 2 include an adapter for DB2?
A. Yes! Starting with ZF 2.1, which was released today.

Q. Is Alan’s IBM i-friendly DB2 adapter for Zend Framework 1.x needed in 2.x?
A. No. Because ZF’s Zend_Db equivalent in 2.x works differently than in 1.x, my 1.x component is not needed in 2.x.

Q. Does ZF 2.1’s DB2 adapter work with IBM i?
A. Yes! Please try it and provide feedback to the ZF team.

MySQL is still alive on IBM i

Over the past week I’ve received several emails, ranging in tone from panicked to angry, seeking clues to the fate of MySQL on IBM i. The database vendor Oracle—recent buyer of Sun Microsystems, and therefore of MySQL—has issued an end-of-life notice for MySQL distributions on IBM i.

IBM i’s primary database is still db2, but many in the community have grown to trust MySQL when deploying MySQL-based applications such as WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, and SugarCRM. Some have trusted MySQL enough to let it into their inner application sanctum, using the IBM DB2 for i Storage Engine (IBMDB2i) to share data between MySQL-based applications and traditional db2-based apps and languages (think RPG).

Now that trust seems to be shattered.

Fortunately, MySQL is an open source product. Zend is still distributing existing versions of MySQL for i, and even if Oracle ceases to create new distributions, someone else can pick up the slack.  An article in IT Jungle quotes IBM’s Allison Butterill and Ian Jarman as offering hope that IBM can find a way to maintain MySQL as an officially supported database, possibly with Zend’s help. It’s all speculation at this stage, but IBM seems to be considering the alternatives and wants to choose the right path.

Forgive me if I seem unduly sanguine about the situation, but many of us ran MySQL on the i before any of these official distributions existed. Back in 2005, the now-defunct site i5php.net hosted distributions of both PHP and MySQL that were compiled for for the IBM i (called the i5 at that time).

The dust hasn’t settled yet. Anything can happen. Yet I believe that MySQL’s open source licensing will, in the end, rescue it from Oracle’s decisions, allowing MySQL to remain viable on the IBM i—with the help of those who care.